Slowhand

17.99

Eric Clapton is acknowledged to be rock’s greatest virtuoso, the unrivalled master of its most essential tool, the solid-body electric guitar. Clapton transfigured three of the 1960s’ most iconic bands, the Yardbirds, Cream and Blind Faith, walking away from each when it failed to measure up to his exacting standards. No life has been more rock ‘n’ roll than Clapton’s in his epic consumption of drugs and alcohol, his insatiable appetite for expensive cars, clothes, and women – most famously revealed when he fell in love with Pattie Boyd, the wife of his best friend, George Harrison, and the inspiration for ‘Layla’. With the benefit of unrestricted access to family members, close friends, and fellow musicians, and his encyclopedic knowledge, Philip Norman has written the definitive portrait of the insecure, often pain-racked man.

In stock

Description

In Slowhand: Eric Clapton’s Blues, Philip Norman returns to the heroic age of British rock he has chronicled unforgettably in Shout!, The Stones and Sir Elton – but this time following a very different hero and introducing a gallery of fascinating new characters.

For half a century Eric Clapton has been acknowledged to be rock music’s greatest virtuoso, the unrivalled master of its indispensable tool, the solid-body electric guitar. His career has spanned the history of rock, and often shaped it via the seminal bands with whom he’s played: the Yardbirds, John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers, Cream, Blind Faith, Derek and the Dominoes. Winner of eighteen Grammys, the Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Fame’s only three-time inductee, he is an enduring influence on every other star soloist who ever wielded a pick, from Jeff Beck and Brian May to Lenny Kravitz and Joe Bonamassa. In his seventies, he remains among the world’s top-grossing concert attractions, as was proved yet again when his Royal Albert Hall shows next March sold out within hours of being announced. The consensus still holds that was spray-painted on the wall of Islington tube station by an anonymous disciple in 1967. ‘Clapton’, it declared, ‘is God.’

Quiet and unassuming he may appear, but no one else in his profession has lived a life of more reckless rock ‘n’ roll excess. A heroin-addict by the end of the 1960s, he seemed set to join those several friends and contemporaries who made death at the age of only twenty-seven seem a prerequisite of immortality: Jimi Hendrix, Brian Jones of the Rolling Stones, Jim Morrison of the Doors, Janis Joplin. After switching to alcoholism in the 1970s, he said the only reason he didn’t commit suicide was that then he’d be unable to drink any more. Physically even more than musically he is the ultimate survivor.

Additional information

Weight0.62 kg
Dimensions23.2 × 15.4 × 3.6 cm
Author

Publisher

Imprint

Cover

Paperback

Pages

448 .

Language

English

Edition
Dewey

782.42166092 (edition:23)

Readership

General – Trade / Code: K