Let Me Tell You What I Mean

15.85

“From the universally acclaimed, best-selling author of the National Book Award-winning The Year of Magical Thinking: ten pieces never before collected that offer an illuminating glimpse into the mind and process of a legendary writer. Here are six pieces written in 1968 from the “Points West” Saturday Evening Post column Joan Didion shared from 1964 to 1969 with her husband, John Gregory Dunne about: American newspapers; a session with Gamblers Anonymous; a visit to San Simeon; being rejected by Stanford; dropping in on Nancy Reagan, wife of the then-governor of California, while a TV crew filmed her at home; and an evening at the annual reunion of WWII veterans from the 101st Airborne Association at the Stardust Hotel in Las Vegas. Here too is a 1976 piece from the New York Times magazine on “Why I Write”; a piece about short stories from New West in 1978; and from The New Yorker, a piece on Hemingway from 1998, and on Martha Stewart

Weight0.268 kg
Dimensions19 × 12.2 × 2.3 cm
Author

Publisher

Imprint

Cover

Hardback

Pages

cm

Language

English

Edition

First edition

Dewey

814.54 (edition:23)

Readership

General – Trade / Code: K

SKU: 9780593318485 Category: Tag:

Description

*A New York Times Best Seller*
 
From one of our most iconic and influential writers: a timeless collection of mostly early pieces that reveal what would become Joan Didion’s subjects, including the press, politics, California robber barons, women, and her own self-doubt.
 
A Most Anticipated Book of 2021 from Vogue, TIME, Bustle, The New York Times and many more. 

These twelve pieces from 1968 to 2000, never before gathered together, offer an illuminating glimpse into the mind and process of a legendary figure. They showcase Joan Didion’s incisive reporting, her empathetic gaze, and her role as “an articulate witness to the most stubborn and intractable truths of our time” (The New York Times Book Review).

Here, Didion touches on topics ranging from newspapers (“the problem is not so much whether one trusts the news as to whether one finds it”), to the fantasy of San Simeon, to not getting into Stanford. In “Why I Write,” Didion ponders the act of writing: “I write entirely to find out what I’m thinking, what I’m looking at, what I see and what it means.” From her admiration for Hemingway’s sentences to her acknowledgment that Martha Stewart’s story is one “that has historically encouraged women in this country, even as it has threatened men,” these essays are acutely and brilliantly observed. Each piece is classic Didion: incisive, bemused, and stunningly prescient.

Additional information

Weight0.268 kg
Dimensions19 × 12.2 × 2.3 cm
Author

Publisher

Imprint

Cover

Hardback

Pages

cm

Language

English

Edition

First edition

Dewey

814.54 (edition:23)

Readership

General – Trade / Code: K